Email scam with subject line: MyLoans Access

Categories: Library
Comments: No Comments
Published on: 21 August 2014

It has come to our attention that there is a fraudulent email scam targeting University of Sydney staff and students.

Some University members have received an email that appears to be coming from Library Services Manager jennifer.myers@sydney.edu.au with the subject line: MyLoans Access. The email informs users that their accounts are about to expire and provides a link to reactivate their accounts.

The email address and web page are not affiliated with the University of Sydney. Anyone who receives the email should delete it immediately.

The page has been blocked by ICT. However, if a staff member or student has already entered their UniKey details on that page contact ICT as soon as possible to report a possible compromise, and change your UniKey password.

scam email

Connecting to Community – translating research into policy practice

Categories: Library
Comments: No Comments
Published on: 14 August 2014

Connecting to CommunityUniversity Library Information Future Series

University of Sydney staff and students are invited to join us at the Library to hear four academics talk about how they are tackling the challenge of translating research knowledge into the community. Bring questions and share your own experiences. Stay to connect with colleagues and chat over lunch.

Speakers

  • Professor Gerard Goggin, ARC Future Fellow, Professor of Media and Communications, Department of Media and Communications
  • Professor Kate White, Chair, Cancer Nursing, Sydney Nursing School
  • Robert Wells, Deputy CEO, Sax Institute
  • Professor Davina Ghersi, Senior Principal Research Scientist, Research Translation Group, National Health and Medical Research Council
  • Ms Kathy Thorncraft, Team Leader, Faculty Services Team: Health Sciences Library

Event details

When: 11am-1pm Wednesday 3 September 2014
Where: Seminar Room
Level 2, Fisher North, Fisher Library
Cost: Free with registration required. Places are limited so book early to avoid disappointment.
Contact: Belinda Norman, Research Data Manager
T 9114 1457 | E belinda.norman@sydney.edu.au
RSVP by Wed 27 August 2014
E library.rsvp@sydney.edu.au

World War I material in the Library collections

Cosme Colony CollectionArticle by Sara Hilder

World War I related material is held in Rare Books and Special Collections, as well as other Library collections. The photo of two young soldiers is from the Cosme Colony Collection, an archive relating to a utopian colony established in Paraguay in the 1890s by William Lane and others. The collection also includes the manuscript of Gavin Souter’s book, A Peculiar People, The Australians in Paraguay, an extract of which is reproduced below.

A joint exhibition with the University Archives will be held in 2015 to mark the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landing.

Cosme Colony Collection
Rare Books and Special Collections.
Extract from: Gavin Souter, A Peculiar People, The Australians in Paraguay. Sydney, Sydney University Press, 1981.

…’ For many of the Australians who had grown up in Paraguay, World War I was a pot of gold that would easily have bought tickets to Australia. When the bugles sounded, young men from Cosme and New Australia enlisted in the British Army. All but one came through the war, and when offered the choice of repatriation to Australia or Paraguay they all chose Paraguay. “There is a claw in this country all right, which drags people back,” wrote Mrs Minnie Jacks to Mary Gilmore in 1916. “Ten have gone from Cosme, and, strange to say, they all want to come back. To read their letters one would think there was only one country in the world, and that was Paraguay.”

Ten went from Cosme, and six from New Australia. The people of Cosme flew the Union Jack and cheered as each volunteer who had come of age rode off into the monte on his way to Caazapá, Maciel railway station, Asunción, and finally, after a five day river trip, Buenos Aires, where the British Army had a recruiting office.

The only Paraguayan Australian who did not return from the war was Allan McLeod’s eldest son Dave. He served in France with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and was killed by a German shell behind the lines. William Wood, who had often worked with Dave McLeod in the canefields at Cosme was a signaller in the Royal Engineers. He went to Gallipoli for a while, and was sometimes sent on errands to Anzac headquarter. Bill had been born in Sydney a year before his parents went to Cosme, and this was his first experience of Australians outside Paraguay. “I couldn’t tell who were the officers,” he recalled in later years. “It was all first names – Harry, Dick, Bill – and everyone was telling jokes all the time.” In 1919 he met his twenty two year old brother Alex in Jerusalem; Alex had served with the Black Watch in Mesopotamia, and by seeing Baghdad he had satisfied an ambition he had harboured ever since reading The Thousand and One Nights at Cosme.

Baghdad, Jerusalem and Gallipoli were romance enough for the Wood boys. … ‘
[Pages 234-5]

Photo: Alex (left) and Bill (right) Wood, sons of William and Lillian Wood, in Jerusalem, 1919. Both returned to Cosme Colony after World War I.
Cosme Colony Collection, Rare Books and Special Collections.

Links

page 1 of 1