Book Giveaway

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Published on: 12 September 2014

iSpheresImagePublicationsImagebank_1513468_0From 12 September to 21 September 2014

Help us to manage our collection and benefit your own
If you’re looking for free books, then you have come to the right place. In line with our established process for the regular and on-going collection reviews of low use duplicates, some of our libraries are currently undergoing a Collection Management review. As a result we are offering thousands of books for free as part of the Book Giveaway. Initially we are housekeeping the collections from the Health Sciences, Badham, and SciTech Libraries, but this will extend to other libraries in the future.

How to Participate

  • The listings of available books have been made available online
  • To participate complete our online form
  • One of our team will determine if the book is available for collection (special circumstances apply to some books) and contact you to advise where you can collect the book(s)
  • And it’s yours to keep – it’s that easy.

Note: There is no limit to the number of items you may request, but please bear in mind that decisions will be made on a first come first serve basis.
You will be notified if the items you requested aren’t available.
It will be the requestor’s responsibility to collect the material and that there will be a period for collection; after which time the book will no longer be available.

Find out more …

 

 

The Piano Music of Meta Overman

Categories: Library
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Published on: 5 September 2014

Meta Overman1 to 30 September 2014

Dutch–born Australian, composer Meta Overman wrote a great many works in her life both in Holland and after migrating to Australia where she lived in Perth and later in Melbourne. Some of the most prominent being seventeen works for piano including two Sonatas, two Sonatinas, two sets of Variations and many single movement works. These wonderful pieces have never been published but have remained in the manuscript versions in which they were first composed and in photocopies on the shelves of a few libraries. Wirripang has now published the complete set of piano works. This publishing company has devoted itself to the compositions of Australian composers and works recorded by Australian artists. The piano works of Meta Overman, in four volumes comes complete with performance CDs in each volume and a separate CD and digital version of all the works edited and recorded by Conservatorium staff member, Jeanell Carrigan. For four weeks the published score, CD and many of the original manuscript scores of Meta Overman will be on display in the Conservatorium Library.

Where: Entrance of the Conservatorium Library
Level 2, C41, Sydney Conservatorium of Music
Corner of Bridge and Macquarie Street, Sydney.
Cost: FREE and open to the public.
Times: Opening times vary – please check the Conservatorium Library website for details.
For more information contact Dr Jeanell Carrigan

Photo of Meta Overman provided by Robert Hyner.

Exhibition: The Three Phases by Alex Gawronski

Categories: Exhibitions, Library
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Published on: 5 September 2014

The Three Pases21 August to 13 October 2014
The Three Phases is a series of 55 predominantly colour photographs mounted on gaterboard. These photos were edited down from hundreds of related others. All the photographs were taken around various Sydney University campuses especially at Sydney College of the Arts and Fisher Library my two workplaces. The photos also include reframed images of otherwise random pages within books I have discovered recently as a frequent user of the Library. Each cabinet has been arranged according to a particular book title suggesting a theme. These constitute the ‘three phases’ of the work’s overarching title; Phase One – The Construction of Reality, Phase Two – The Art Crisis and Phase Three – Archaeology as a Political Practice. There is a strong focus on the everyday in this ensemble of works that is combined at times with other more absurdist representations. This combination speaks of a certain anxiety regarding the ‘truth’ of photographic imagery in our pervasively digital age but also the freedom for constant recombination digital technology allows. Overall, the images are arranged to imply an open poetic narrative relative to the theme of each cabinet. Their arrangement over three descending floors also hints at the spatial dimension of photographs as a collective archive to be mined in ever differing ways.

Fisher Library and Sydney College of the Arts Series of Art projects
This series, curated by Associate Professor Michael Goldberg, showcases the work of Sydney College of the Arts students, staff and alumni for the wider University community.

Where: Levels 2, 3 and 4 exhibition cabinets, Fisher Library North
Cost: FREE and open daily to the public
Times: Opening times vary, please check the website

For further information contact:
Dr Michael Goldberg
E michael.goldberg@sydney.edu.au

Email scam with subject line: MyLoans Access

Categories: Library
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Published on: 21 August 2014

It has come to our attention that there is a fraudulent email scam targeting University of Sydney staff and students.

Some University members have received an email that appears to be coming from Library Services Manager jennifer.myers@sydney.edu.au with the subject line: MyLoans Access. The email informs users that their accounts are about to expire and provides a link to reactivate their accounts.

The email address and web page are not affiliated with the University of Sydney. Anyone who receives the email should delete it immediately.

The page has been blocked by ICT. However, if a staff member or student has already entered their UniKey details on that page contact ICT as soon as possible to report a possible compromise, and change your UniKey password.

scam email

Connecting to Community – translating research into policy practice

Categories: Library
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Published on: 14 August 2014

Connecting to CommunityUniversity Library Information Future Series

University of Sydney staff and students are invited to join us at the Library to hear four academics talk about how they are tackling the challenge of translating research knowledge into the community. Bring questions and share your own experiences. Stay to connect with colleagues and chat over lunch.

Speakers

  • Professor Gerard Goggin, ARC Future Fellow, Professor of Media and Communications, Department of Media and Communications
  • Professor Kate White, Chair, Cancer Nursing, Sydney Nursing School
  • Robert Wells, Deputy CEO, Sax Institute
  • Professor Davina Ghersi, Senior Principal Research Scientist, Research Translation Group, National Health and Medical Research Council
  • Ms Kathy Thorncraft, Team Leader, Faculty Services Team: Health Sciences Library

Event details

When: 11am-1pm Wednesday 3 September 2014
Where: Seminar Room
Level 2, Fisher North, Fisher Library
Cost: Free with registration required. Places are limited so book early to avoid disappointment.
Contact: Belinda Norman, Research Data Manager
T 9114 1457 | E belinda.norman@sydney.edu.au
RSVP by Wed 27 August 2014
E library.rsvp@sydney.edu.au

World War I material in the Library collections

Cosme Colony CollectionArticle by Sara Hilder

World War I related material is held in Rare Books and Special Collections, as well as other Library collections. The photo of two young soldiers is from the Cosme Colony Collection, an archive relating to a utopian colony established in Paraguay in the 1890s by William Lane and others. The collection also includes the manuscript of Gavin Souter’s book, A Peculiar People, The Australians in Paraguay, an extract of which is reproduced below.

A joint exhibition with the University Archives will be held in 2015 to mark the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landing.

Cosme Colony Collection
Rare Books and Special Collections.
Extract from: Gavin Souter, A Peculiar People, The Australians in Paraguay. Sydney, Sydney University Press, 1981.

…’ For many of the Australians who had grown up in Paraguay, World War I was a pot of gold that would easily have bought tickets to Australia. When the bugles sounded, young men from Cosme and New Australia enlisted in the British Army. All but one came through the war, and when offered the choice of repatriation to Australia or Paraguay they all chose Paraguay. “There is a claw in this country all right, which drags people back,” wrote Mrs Minnie Jacks to Mary Gilmore in 1916. “Ten have gone from Cosme, and, strange to say, they all want to come back. To read their letters one would think there was only one country in the world, and that was Paraguay.”

Ten went from Cosme, and six from New Australia. The people of Cosme flew the Union Jack and cheered as each volunteer who had come of age rode off into the monte on his way to Caazapá, Maciel railway station, Asunción, and finally, after a five day river trip, Buenos Aires, where the British Army had a recruiting office.

The only Paraguayan Australian who did not return from the war was Allan McLeod’s eldest son Dave. He served in France with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and was killed by a German shell behind the lines. William Wood, who had often worked with Dave McLeod in the canefields at Cosme was a signaller in the Royal Engineers. He went to Gallipoli for a while, and was sometimes sent on errands to Anzac headquarter. Bill had been born in Sydney a year before his parents went to Cosme, and this was his first experience of Australians outside Paraguay. “I couldn’t tell who were the officers,” he recalled in later years. “It was all first names – Harry, Dick, Bill – and everyone was telling jokes all the time.” In 1919 he met his twenty two year old brother Alex in Jerusalem; Alex had served with the Black Watch in Mesopotamia, and by seeing Baghdad he had satisfied an ambition he had harboured ever since reading The Thousand and One Nights at Cosme.

Baghdad, Jerusalem and Gallipoli were romance enough for the Wood boys. … ‘
[Pages 234-5]

Photo: Alex (left) and Bill (right) Wood, sons of William and Lillian Wood, in Jerusalem, 1919. Both returned to Cosme Colony after World War I.
Cosme Colony Collection, Rare Books and Special Collections.

Links

Fisher 24 hour study zone

Categories: Library
Comments: 7 Comments
Published on: 30 July 2014

Fisher 24/7 Study ZoneWho can access the study zone?
All enrolled University of Sydney students carrying a current student card.

Where is the study zone?
Entrance Level (Foyer and South wing only)

What can I access after library hours?
You can access:

  • Computers
  • Online Library resources
  • Printers
  • The University wireless network
  • Group study spaces and lounges

How do I enter the study zone after library hours?
You can enter the study zone by swiping your student card at the after-hours entrance door 15 minutes after the Library closes. No special registration is required.

If you are using the Fisher 24 hour study zone before the Library closes, you will need to collect your belongings and borrow any items you need before exiting the Library at closing time. After the building has been cleared for re-entry to the 24 hour study zone, you can use your student card to re-enter.

What are the security arrangements?

  • Security patrols
  • Security emergency help points
  • CCTV cameras

You must keep your student card with you at all times, and follow the instructions of Security staff if directed.

For more information, see Security and your safety:
http://sydney.edu.au/current_students/transport_safety/safety.shtml

University Security Service: 9351-3333
This is an emergency number only.

 

Introducing BONUS+

Categories: Library
Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: 15 July 2014

BONUS+ logoBONUS+ is a new seamless Library service for our students and staff, which will provide an alternative and faster way for you to access books that we don’t own or are on loan in our Library.

What is Bonus+?
BONUS+ is a co-operative book resource-sharing initiative among 14 major university libraries in Australia and New Zealand.

What’s in it for me?
You will have access to other library collections. If we don’t have a particular book, or the copies we have are out on loan, you will be able to see if any of the member libraries have a copy for you to borrow.

Who can use the service?
All students and staff at the University of Sydney.

How does it work?
When you search our Library catalogue and don’t find the item that you are after, simply click on the Bonus+ icon to see if another library has a copy available. The request is processed automatically – no filling in forms. And when the item arrives, we will email you to let you know that your book is ready for pickup. You can also keep track of your requests via MyLoans.

When can I start requesting from these libraries?
Wednesday 16 July 2014.

Find out more: sydney.edu.au/library/borrowing/bonus.html

 

University of Sydney named as JSTOR’s 2013 Highest Usage Award recipient in Australia

Categories: Digital news, Library
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Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: 4 July 2014

JSTOR logoThis award recognises the University of Sydney’s commitment to a high quality research experience for students and scholars. As the highest institutional JSTOR user in Australia (and the 19th highest user worldwide), the University of Sydney logged the highest number of PDF downloads for archival content on the JSTOR platform in 2013—more than any other participating institution in Australia.

Library survey of academics and researchers

Categories: Library
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Published on: 18 June 2014

researcherWe would like to provide an update on the Library survey of academics and researchers that was conducted in February 2014. The survey aimed to gather information about emerging trends in academic and researcher attitudes and practice.

We are pleased to report that a large proportion of the University of Sydney academic community responded to the survey and provided valuable feedback. One of the clearly emerging trends is that almost half of the survey respondents are very interested in integrating digital research activities and methodologies more deeply into their work.

Currently, we are waiting for the other participating Go8 university libraries to conclude their surveys and provide comparative benchmarked data. The Library will be reviewing the local survey and benchmarked data, when it is received. We will then make the dataset and analysis available to the academic community, and will consider how to effectively address the researcher needs expressed through the survey.

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