HeadOn photo exhibition: Mongolian Youth

Categories: Exhibitions, Library
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Published on: 26 April 2016

26/04/2016

“It’s all going so fast,”sighs Gerelkhuu, a 26 year old artist living in Ulaanbaatar. “We have to remember who we are and to be careful not to lose our soul. If we don’t know who we are, we don’t know where we’ll go.”

When: 26 April – 30 May 2016

During a live performance of the rock band Mohanik, interior designer Enerel, 26, paints on a wall of the Glamour art gallery in downtown UB. In 2013, Enerel who used to live and study for 10 years in the US decided it was time to return to Mongolia. “More and more people are coming back” she said “bringing back what they learned abroad”.
During a live performance of the rock band Mohanik, interior designer Enerel, 26, paints on a wall of the Glamour art gallery in downtown UB. In 2013, Enerel who used to live and study for 10 years in the US decided it was time to return to Mongolia. “More and more people are coming back” she said “bringing back what they learned abroad”.

Where: Fisher Library Level 2 Corridor 208

Based in Brussels, Belgium, Marika Dee is a self-taught freelance documentary photographer. Originally, she worked as a jurist in international law and only discovered photography at a later age.
Her work explores social issues and youth culture.

As Mongolia is changing at a frantic pace and finding itself at the forefront of globalisation, its young urban generation is trying to keep up and figure out its identity.

Over the last few years Mongolia has experienced an unprecedented economic growth, driven by the massive development of mineral mining. With half of Mongolia’s 2.8 million living in the country’s capital and largest city Ulaanbaatar and more than half of the national population under the age of 30, the country has a young and increasingly urban population.

Almost 25 years after the democratic revolution that ended the communist era when Mongolia was a satellite state of the Soviet Union, a whole country is changing and its young urban generation is searching for an identity, trying to negotiate the difficult balance between the forces of globalization and the preservation of tradition.

If you like this exhibition, why not check out the HeadOn exhibition in the Law Library foyer on clouds (Photos by Daniel Arnaldi)

#headon #usydlibrary #mongolia #FisherLibrary

HeadOn photo exhibition: Clouds

26/04/02016

“To look at a cloud is often to look into a world where impressions suggest themselves like persistent dreams and memories, you see what you think is there, what your memory is telling you it is, rather than just seeing what is there.” Daniel Arnaldi (photographer)

When: 26 April – 30 May 2016Daniel Arnaldi : Clouds

Where: Herbert Freehills Law Library Foyer

Daniel Arnaldi’s work explores the human condition through portraiture, landscape and still life using the medium of photography to illustrate the range of inner states of our consciousness.

As I was editing these images for the show I realised they reflected the process that I’ve gone through and by extension a process that everyone going through a transformative phase might experience, they have been broken up into 3 subsets each one with its own title to reflect the various stages of such transformations.

Awakenings
The beginning of an awareness often coming in the form of a shock, violent, fiery, spectacular but also foreboding and threatening.

Disquiet
An uncomfortable stage where we have to come to terms and process new information that can sometimes be difficult. Feelings of isolation, depression, melancholy can be part of this process, sometimes all you can do is just ride it out, the colours in this particular series have been intentionally chosen for this effect.

Resolutions
As the name suggests a more energised stage tempered with focus, clarity and calmness. The blues invoking a feeling of tranquility while the more defined structure of the clouds still expressing strength. In all these photos clouds are still wide open to interpretation by the viewer, I hope that you let these photos be an entry point into your own inner journey of reflection, memory and emotion.

If you like this exhibition, why not check out the HeadOn exhibition in Fisher Level 2 about Mongolian Youth (Photos by Marika Dee)

#headon #Usydlibrary #FisherLibrary

Exhibition and Event: Silent Tears

25/02/2016

“Photography has a well-regarded role for bringing the plight of silent victims into focus, providing a powerful opportunity for understanding and action. Bearing witness to the realities of these twelve women’s lives should be uncomfortable and challenging for audiences,” Belinda Mason

'Now many decades on, she was able to reveal for the first time the ongoing sexual violence she endured as a child with physical disability. She is no longer threatened by the perpetrator, yet the psychological trauma forces her to be anonymous in this project and unlike other participants reveal no further information about her experience. She is one of the many who still are trying to make sense of, and come to terms with, what happened to them, before they feel they can speak out.” -Belinda Mason with permission from the participant
photo by Belinda Mason

When: 1 March – 22 April 2016

Where: Herbert Freehills Law Library; New Sydney Law School Building F10

Accessibility information: http://silenttears.com.au/accessibility-options/

Belinda Mason’s Silent Tears reveals twelve Australian women’s haunting stories of disability and violence using saturated water to symbolise the streams of tears these survivors have silently endured.

Each participant has either experienced violence because they have disability, or has acquired a impairment, as a result of violence. Theirs is a powerful and compelling story of psychological, physical, emotional, economic, and cultural violence. The participants of the exhibition share their stories of domestic violence, forced sterilisation, psychological trauma, neglect and violence within institutions, and by family members.

“The power of Silent Tears lies in the hands of those who participate in it. Without stories there is silence.

“With the impact of my son’s death, and after having the girls and then a still born, five days before its born, and the relationship I was in with my ex-partner was violent all the time. I was treated not like a person; to me it was like an animal. I couldn’t handle it, being bashed all the time, getting cheated on by someone O loved so much. I just got tired of all that and I turned to drugs. Now as a person I know I can overcome all that life throws at me.” – Anonymous, Australia 2015
photo by Belinda Mason

Without stories told, we are voiceless. Without our stories heard, we are invisible. It is even harder when the stories are hard to hear and impossible to imagine,” said Belinda Mason.

Silent Tears is the result of three artist’s exploration of 12 women’s stories using a variety of photographic techniques and multi-media. Led by Mason, and supported by artists Dieter Kiernan (video) and Margherita Coppolino (documentary photography), audiences are immersed in the participant’s experiences to stimulate a deeper understanding of the diversity of violence, discrimination and survival.

Contact:

Belinda Mason: photography@belindamason.com Website: http://www.belindamason.com/

 

Join us for a special presentation by two of the artists, Belinda Mason and Denise Beckwith followed by a panel discussion on the issues.

Wednesday 6 April
7 to 8.30pm
Law School Foyer
Level 2, Sydney Law School
Eastern Avenue
University of SydneyThe event is free, but registration is required

#silenttears #sydney_library

Exhibition: Laugh Lines and Other Distractions

4/02/2016

Comics are a natural way to communicate. If you can draw a picture, you can tell a story.

By Julie Price

When: 8 February – 31 August 2016

Where: Fisher Library F03; Level 2 Exhibition spaceLaughLine-Poster-Final_sm

Everybody knows what a comic is. We’ve all read them, laughed at them and enjoyed them. A few well-chosen images can transport meaning across language barriers.

Threads of humour are teased from many situations: political circuses; the foibles of gender; even war, as soldiers entertaining themselves find domestic appreciation for larrikin humour. So many strands to spin a chuckle from be it an ocker, a Major, a gumnut, the Little Boy from Manly; all have made Australians laugh through the years. What was true throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries holds true now – any newspaper that wants to be taken seriously simply must run a cartoon or two.

Enquiries: Rare Books and Special Collections P: +(61) 2 9351 2992

#RareBooks #Humour #Sydney_library

Ex Libris Fisherarium: Persons of Interest

23/11/2015

PhD candidate Glenn Wallace and UNSWAD academic Dr Katherine Moline give us an intriguing insight into the machinations of ASIO and the Cold War era, writes Dr Michael Goldberg.

When: 2 November 2015 – 2 December 2015

Where: Fisher Library F03 Levels 2,3, and 4

Personsofinterest_pic1For over 40 years, Australia’s Security and Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) seized books that were deemed subversive in raids on the homes of people suspected of conspiracy. In recent years ASIO files documenting the activities of certain ‘Persons of Interest’ have been released.

For this iteration of Ex Libris Fisherarium, ‘Era of Surveillance’ maps where confiscated texts are located in Fisher Library. Viewers are invited to explore the Library as a space where art, architecture, politics, knowledge and power converge.

Era of surveillance: Persons of interest / Family
Artists: Katherine Moline and Glenn Wallace

 

#Asio

#sureveillance

#Sydney_library #ExLibrisFisherarium

ANZAC centenary: Stories of War

Categories: Exhibitions
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Published on: 11 November 2015

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When: 24 April 2015 – 1 February 2016

Where: Fisher Library F03, Exhibition Space Level 2

 

During World War I the University of Sydney played a unique role in the War effort, with the expertise of its academic staff and students in high demand. The members of the University responded with enthusiasm and bravery, with 200 students and 36 staff on active service overseas by the end of 1915.

As the war progressed, so too did the need for qualified doctors, engineers, scientists and veterinarians. As early as 1916, the University recognised the importance of honouring and memorialising the efforts of its community and the lives lost, and began to collect letters, photographs, records, stories and publications.

Drawn primarily from the University Archives and Rare Books and Special Collections, with contributions from the Macleay Museum and the Faculties of Medicine and Education and Social Work, this exhibition explores the nuanced and varied ways in which the University, and its men and women, experienced, understood and responded to World War I.

#LestWeForget #Sydney_library

Ex Libris Fisherarium: Ontologías y Códices

Categories: Exhibitions, Library
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Published on: 7 October 2015

Sydney College of the Arts proudly presents:

Ontologías y Códices

Artist: David Corbet

Curated by: Dr. Michael Goldberg

 

When: 22 Sep – 29 Oct 2015Entre irse y quedarse

Where: Fisher Library F03, Levels 1,2 and 3

“This exhibition is inspired by my adventures in the worlds of hispanic literature, poetry, song and art-making. Drawing from diverse sources, it is a personal homage to the vitality and richness of the worldwide cultures expressed and celebrated predominantly in the Spanish language – la lengua española. Such an assemblage constitutes, in a sense, a series of indices or, in a library context, codices. Among the random we seek order and likeness, we may find seriality and continuity of meaning. My studio practice and research into language systems has pursued this notion of seriality, subtitling an earlier exhibition ‘Ontologies for a small planet’. Among these disparate references my own studio work is interspersed, largely on paper, ranging from etchings and drawings to notebooks and notations.” – David Corbet

 

Las vidas de otrosThe exhibition is made up of three parts:

Level 1
“Entre irse y quedarse”
(English: “Between going and staying”)This display is inspired by the text of a poem by the late Mexican Nobel Laureate Ocavio Paz, and the late Catalan printmaker Antoni Tàpies.

Level 2
“Las vidas de otros”
(English: “The lives of others”)This display is a collection of works, books and objects obliquely exploring our human power relationship with animals, through ontologies of classification, patterning and adornment.

Level 3
“La lotería de la existencia”
(English: “The lottery of existence”)This display celebrates ontologies of chance, of religion and mysticism, and of altar-making. It explores how objects can become imbued with ritualised power through their organisation, and transformations of meaning brought about by context.

 

Rare Books Exhibition: Circumstances of Interest

2/10/2015

RavelDiaryBannerimg

Travel diaries, journals and logs from Fisher Rare Books and Special Collections

 

When: 2 October – 31 December 2015

Where: Fisher Library F03; Level 3 Corridor

 

For long-distance travelers in the 19th and early 20th centuries, keeping a journal was a popular method of keeping oneself gainfully occupied during long months spent at sea.

Through a selection of manuscript travel diaries, journals and logs from Fisher Rare Books and Special Collections, this new exhibition provides a window (or, a porthole) into the 19th century shipboard experience.

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Read more on the Rare Books blog

#RareBooks #Sydney_library

 

Exhibition: Kimnara records: a collaboration in Art and Music

1/10/2015

The exhibition will display artworks by Fusae Ikeda that were created for Kimnara Records CD covers.Fusae Ikeda

Curated by Marie Chellos, Glen Smyth and Dr Simon Baker

 

When: 1 October – 30 November 2015

Where: Conservatorium Library. Level 2, Macquarie Street C41. Sydney NSW 2000

Developed by Simon Barker in 2005, Kimnara Records is an independent label offering music by a core group of Australian musicians, University of Sydney lecturers, including Phil Slater, Matt McMahon, Carl Dewhurst, and Scott Tinkler.

Dr Simon Barker (PhD Jazz Performance) is a lecturer in Jazz Studies at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. In addition to his solo performances and recordings, Simon co-leads several internationally recognized collaborative ensembles.
This is an example of non-traditional research output (NTRO) exemplifies creative work as research.

The exhibition will feature 4 framed posters and 12 CDs (some listed here).

“From Devil to Human Being: celebrating postwar reconciliation”

23 September 2015

An exhibition to commemorate 70 years since the end of the Asia-Pacific war.

When: 23 Sep – 31 November 2015

Where: Herbert Smith Freehills Law Library, New Sydney Law School Building F10

Curator: Susannah Smith curating the research of Yasuko Claremont, Japanese Studies, University of Sydney

Exhibition photo 2_180X267

 

The Asia-Pacific war was viciously fought on both sides and finally, ended 70 years ago.

This exhibition re-examines the legacy of the war and all efforts made to build peace and reconciliation. It highlights the efforts of individuals and groups to achieve peace and friendship between those who were once enemies. Their stories are told in these photographs.

Themes depicted in the exhibition range from meetings between former enemies, to group peace activities and sites of remembering. The exhibition also explores how the next generation comes to terms with the legacy of conflict.

Painting by HIDEICHI KAIHO, 1999

The exhibition is part of a conference project entitled Wounds, Scars and Healing: Civil Society and Postwar Pacific basin Reconciliation. Its ultimate theme is reconnecting through friendship and brotherhood which takes place from 30 September – 2 October 2015 at the University of Sydney.

 

For updates on social media:

#70yson #AsiaPacificWar #Sydney_library

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