20 Aug: Les Murray Poetry Reading

We are delighted to welcome Les Murray back to Fisher Library for a reading from his newest poetry collection, “Waiting for the Past” (2015), his first in five years.

Les Murray

 

When: Thursday 20 August 2015; 5.30pm (refreshments) 6.00 – 7pm (reading)

Where: Fisher Library F03; Seminar Room; Level 2

In Waiting for the Past he continues his use of molten language.

From ‘The Black Beaches’ to ‘Radiant Pleats, Mulgoa’, from ‘High Speed Trap Space’ to ‘1960 Brought the Electric’, this is verse that renews and transforms our sense of the world.

Another new book of Les’, On Bunyah, will be published in October 2015. It brings together a collection of the poems Murray has written about the place where he comes from and by extension about the rural life and small communities of Australia.

Les Murray is one of Australia’s living treasures. He has published fourteen books of verse in Australia and his work is studied in schools and universities in Australia and beyond.

 

All are invited to attend this free event and light refreshments will be provided. Seats are limited for this very popular event so book early to avoid disappointment.

Cost: Free with booking required

RSVP: library.rsvp@sydney.edu.au  by 17 August 2015

T 02 9114 0866

for updates on social media: #LesMurrayatFisher

Exhibition: Bookish II – 1 July to 5 August

Categories: Exhibitions, Library
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Published on: 26 July 2015

Ex Libris Fisherarium:

Marrickville Garage presents: BOOKISH IIEx Libris Fisherarium: Bookish II: Jane Eyre Montage (image by ) Anne Kay

When: 1 July – 5 August 2015, 9:00am – 5:00pm

Where: Fisher Library F03, Levels 2, 3 and 4.

 

In 2013 artist space Marrickville Garage organised a project based around the photo book called BOOKISH. BOOKISH II is an extension of that original concept, wherein three artists have used the book as a starting point for three different approaches to working with books as inspiration, as concept, as object and as source.

Anne Kay’s “Learning to draw from books”, is a series of photo-montages, which developed out of an enjoyment of 18th and 19th century novels, a corner of literature that is now a little dusty and arcane. Initially, the attraction was to the literary forms of the period, and the opportunity the narratives offered to peek into earlier, somewhat foreign societal customs. After accumulating an eclectic assortment of paperback reprints, the attraction extended to the cover illustrations, which hinted at the stylistic variation over the decades in illustration and book cover design. In this series of artworks, the cover illustrations are the subjects for learning to draw.

Jane Polkinghorne has organised “A Brief Scatological Survey” of books and objects scatological in nature. Dominique Laporte’s 1978 book Histoire de la merde (Prologue)published by MIT in 2000 as History of Shit, is used for this project as a foundation text. Laporte’s analysis of shit links the development of Paris to control of the French language, and can be more broadly read as a critique of the increasing control governments wield over every aspect of our lives, literally controlling us from the toilet to the grave.

A Brief Scatological Survey” brings together the works of Trevor Fry, Sally Clarke, and Margaret Mayhew, as well as objects from Polkinghorne’s collection of scatological objects alongside various publications on the scatological.

Sarah Newall has researched the documentation of Australian Aboriginal “bush tucker” and this includes the European botanical drawings of Sydney Parkinson who was on the Endeavour in 1770 with Captain Cook, through to modern publications. This is an extension of her ongoing interest in flora and its representation within the domestic sphere. Recently this has expanded into gardening projects and sustainable materials and practices.

'A History of Shit' in Ex Libris Fisherarium: Bookish II (image: Jane Polkinghorne)Collective title for the project and/or individual titles.

BOOKISH II:

“Learning to draw from books” Anne Kay

“A Brief Scatological Survey”, curated by Jane Polkinghorne. Works by Sally Clarke, Trevor Fry, Margaret Mayhew and Jane Polkinghorne. Includes various books and publications

“wild food project” Sarah Newall

Contact:

Associate Professor Michael Goldberg

T: +61 2 9351 1082

E: Michael.Goldberg@sydney.edu.au

 

For updates on social media: #Sydney_Library #RareBooks

Special Exhibition: Magna Carta: 1215 – 2015

When: 15 June – 22 June 2015; 9:00am – 5:00pm

Where: Fisher Library F03, Level 3

 

It is 800 years ago that the Magna Carta, the “Great Charta” originally drafted by the Magna Carta working copy from the 14th centuryArchbishop of Canterbury has been accepted by King John of England.

Come and see a selection of Magna Carta copies held by the Rare Books and Special Collections at Fisher Library, including a 14th century working copy.

Julie Price, Liaison Librarian of the Rare Books and Special Collections, points out the 14th century copy in the centre of the display as her favourite: “I imagine it being carried on horseback through the English countryside, used to dispense law.”

Now – for one week only– you have the great opportunity to see these old working copies displayed in the Fisher Library.

 

Contact: Julie.Price@sydney.edu.au

T: 2 9351 2992

E: rarebook.library@sydney.edu.au

For updates on social media: #RareBooks

10 July: Frédéric Billiet: The Musiconis Project

The University of Sydney Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections proudly present:

 

Professor Frédéric Billiet’s talk on

The MUSICONIS project: Representations of sound & music in the Middle AgesFrederic Billiet

 

When: 10th July; 10:00 – 11:00 am

Where: Fisher Library, Seminar Room Level 2

Introduction by Dr. Jane Hardie (Director, International Musicological Society)

The Musiconis project (University Paris-Sorbonne, French National Research Agency – ANR) is dedicated to the study of sound within the Medieval image. Besides regular seminars (reported in a dedicated blog), a specific bibliography and a lexicon in Latin, Langue d’Oïl and Langue d’Oc, the heart of this project has been the development of database using a new model of iconographic indexation (musiconis.paris-sorbonne.fr).

RB Add.Ms. 373. 17th century. Handwritten Gregorian gradual on vellum. Spain.This model includes historical and organological information, as well as a description of the sound features in each image, and an interpretation of iconographic analogies.

The presentation focuses on the letter B of the first psalm depicting King David tuning his harp (ms. 246 D, fol. 1, BM of Charleville-Mézières). Thanks to the detailed observations regarding the proportions and the organization of the performer and his instrument on the page, as well as the reference to the commentaries of St Augustine, the research team discovered that David may actually refer to the figure of Christ, sitting on a foliage, as a metaphor of the divine Verb (musical of course, but not audible to the human ears).

For updates on social media: #RareBooks #FisherLibrary #Sydney_Library

Contact: Julie Price julie.price@sydney.edu.au  +61 2 9114 2321

 

Films At Fisher – final movie of the semester: Sergeant York

Categories: FilmsAtFisher, Library
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Published on: 29 June 2015

Films At Fisher proudly presents the final installment in this semester’s film series:

Sergeant YorkSergeant_York_1941_Poster

(US/1941) Dir. Howard Hawks

 

When: Tuesday 30 June; 5:30pm

Where: Fisher Library F03, Level 2, Exhibition Space

 

“I figured them guns was killin’ hundreds, maybe thousands, and there weren’t nothin’ anybody could do, but to stop them guns. And that’s what I done.”

Gary Cooper was never better than in this as a hillbilly turned all American hero. Ostensibly concerning WW1, the film’s release shortly before the bombing of Pearl Harbor transformed it into both stirring wartime propaganda and a box office smash.
The Films At Fisher series will be continuing on 4 August 2015, 5:30pm with the all time classic African Queen featuring Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn.

 

For updates on social media: #FilmsAtFisher; #FisherLibrary

Exhibition: Highlights and Lowlifes – 29 June to 31 August

An exhibition on the Australian Holdings in the Detective Fiction Collection

Rare Books and Special Collections will be hosting a display of some of the Australian works held in the Detective Fiction Collection.

When: Monday 29 June to 31 August 2015, 9:00am – 5:00pm

Where: Rare Books Reading Room, Fisher Library F03, Level 1Covers from the books: ‘Cocaine Blues (Kerry Greenwood, 2012), ‘Death Wears a Lady’s Smile’ (Don Haring), ‘The Dying Trade’ (Peter Corris, 1980), ‘Still Murder’ (Finola Moorhead, 1991),’ Grim Pickings’ (Jennifer Rowe, 1987)

The Detective Fiction Collection began informally in the 1960’s following a donation to the Library, which contained a large number of Penguin crime paperbacks. More titles were extracted from later donations until, in 1974, the Library bought a major American collection of detective fiction (3,500 titles), many of them valuable first editions. This purchase so pleased Frederick May (then the University of Sydney’s Professor of Italian) that he donated 1,200 of his own crime fiction books, with the Library purchasing another 800 titles from his estate in 1978. At this time, the collection grows by donation, a little purchasing, and by the addition of NSW titles received on legal deposit.

The Detective Fiction Collection began informally in the 1960’s following a donation to the Library, which contained a large number of Penguin crime paperbacks. More titles were extracted from later donations until, in 1974, the Library bought a major American collection of detective fiction (3,500 titles), many of them valuable first editions. This purchase so pleased Frederick May (then the University of Sydney’s Professor of Italian) that he donated 1,200 of his own crime fiction books, with the Library purchasing another 800 titles from his estate in 1978. At this time, the collection grows by donation, a little purchasing, and by the addition of NSW titles received on legal deposit.

 

Collecting Crime

The Detective Fiction Collection is the biggest of its kind in Australia and is a major research resource for students of the genre, and of Australian literature, social studies and popular culture in general. Although called “detective fiction”, crime fiction would be a more apt term to describe the works held. Holdings run the gamut of the genre, ranging over murder and detective stories, spy fiction, psychological thrillers and police procedurals. All publishing formats are included, including variant editions, covers and multi-media. True crime material is not collected.

 

Australian holdings on display

The Australian holdings in this collection form a major part of its strengths. Crime in all its permutations has existed in our fiction since Australia’s days as a penal colony. The display will showcase the 19th century crime stories of writers such as John Lang, Marcus Clarke and Fergus Hume (“Mystery of a Hansom Cab”); the early Boney novels of Arthur Upfield; the pulp fiction explosion of the mid-20th century; the strength of Australia’s forgotten female crime writers from the 19th century such as Ellen Davitt and Mary Fortune through to the 20th century’s now unremembered stars such as Pat Flower, Pat Carlon, Margot Neville and June Wright. Also on display are examples of the most recent flowering of Australian detective fiction, beginning with Peter Corris and including Peter Temple, Barry Maitland, Claire McNab et al.

 

For updates on social media: #RareBooks; #FisherLibrary

 

Films At Fisher: Fourty Thousand Horsemen – 23 June

“They fought and suffered to emerge triumphant – the greatest cavalry force of modern times”

 

The Films At Fisher Series proudly presents:Forty_Thousand_Horsemen

Forty Thousand Horsemen

(AUS/1940) Dir. Charles Chauvel

Charles Chauvel was Australia’s first major film director. Depicting the actions of Australia’s Light Horse Regiment in Palestine in WW1, the film contains some striking action sequences.

Fisher Library F03

Level 2 Exhibition Space

5:30 pm

 

#FilmsAtFisher

For staff and students

Check out our other films in the series: Films At Fisher complete program

Films At Fisher: La Grand Illusion (Fr/1937) – 16 June

Categories: FilmsAtFisher, Library
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Published on: 10 June 2015

“My chief aim is to express the common humanity of men” – Jean Renoir

The Films At Fisher Series proudly presents:220px-GrandeIllusion

La Grand Illusion

(Fr/1937) Dir. Jean Renoir

Often dubbed the ultimate anti-war film by the greatest of all French film-makers, La Grande Illusion is one of the greatest masterpieces of world cinema. Set in a German POW camp in WW1, the film is sympathetic to all of its characters whilst portraying tensions of nationality, class and race.

Fisher Library F03

Level 2 Exhibition Space

5:30 pm

 

#FilmsAtFisher

For staff and students

Check out our other films in the series: Films At Fisher complete program

New exhibition: ZEEN by Leigh Rigozzi

This exhibition in Fisher Library is the next in the ongoing series of art projects Ex Libris Fisherarium curated by Associate Professor Michael Goldberg. The projects comprising work by staff, alumni and associates of Sydney College of the Arts are themed around the idea of ‘the book’ in all its historical and contemporary manifestations. Read more >

 

 

Films At Fisher: The Lost Patrol (US/1934) – 9 June

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Published on: 3 June 2015

“BLISTERING SUN…BLAZING BULLETS!”200px-Lost_patrol

The Films At Fisher Series proudly presents:

The Lost Patrol

(US/1934) Dir. John Ford

In the Mesopotamian desert during WW1, a small group of soldiers search for their comrades whilst struggling with thirst, heat and deadly snipers. A war movie shot like a western, this is an adventure romp of the old school.

Fisher Library F03

Level 2 Exhibition Space

5:30 pm

 

#FilmsAtFisher

For staff and students

Check out our other films in the series: Films At Fisher complete program

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