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University of Sydney named as JSTOR’s 2013 Highest Usage Award recipient in Australia

Categories: Digital news, Library
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Published on: 4 July 2014

JSTOR logoThis award recognises the University of Sydney’s commitment to a high quality research experience for students and scholars. As the highest institutional JSTOR user in Australia (and the 19th highest user worldwide), the University of Sydney logged the highest number of PDF downloads for archival content on the JSTOR platform in 2013—more than any other participating institution in Australia.

Database trial until 31 July 2014: SAGE Research Methods

Categories: Databases, Library
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Published on: 6 June 2014

This is “A research methods tool created to help researchers, faculty and students with their research projects. (more…)

Digital news: JSTOR

Categories: Digital news
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Published on: 29 May 2014

JSTORYou can now access the complete collection of over 290 major Arts & Sciences scholarly journals from your Library!

Try it out at: http://ezproxy.library.usyd.edu.au/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/

Do you use SciFinder?

Categories: Databases
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Published on: 28 January 2014

scifinderRoughly two thirds of all structure searches in SciFinder now originate from the new Non-Java CAS Structure Editor. Find out about new features and enhancements in the latest Non-Java CAS Structure Editor Update:
http://www.cas.org/products/scifinder/whats-new-in-scifinder

 

 

 

Access to Library electronic resources

Categories: Databases
Comments: 11 Comments
Published on: 5 July 2013

The Library provides access to an extensive collection of electronic resources, including e-journals and e-books, which are widely used for research, learning and teaching in the University. These resources are available under publishers licence for all University staff and students.

From Wednesday 17th July authentication via Unikey or Library barcode will be required for access to these resources from computers on campus, including wireless access, following the same procedure as the existing arrangement for off-campus access. This change has become necessary to ensure the University complies with the publishers’ licence agreements and to avoid putting access to these critical resources at risk.

Exemptions have been made for public access computers in all libraries, which will not prompt for authentication except for those resources that already require it both on and off campus eg. SciFinder Scholar and Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) ebooks. This exemption for most resources will enable continued access for those Library members and walk-in users who do not have Unikeys.

The change is necessary to ensure we are complying with the licence agreements for our electronic resources. Recent incidents of unauthorised access have put access to some key electronic resources at risk. Compromised computers or servers have been used for unauthorised or unlicensed access to our resources. This puts the Library in breach of licence, and in the past publishers have blocked access to their resources because of such breaches. Adding an authentication step in the process guards against this risk.

The change has been timed for the semester break to minimise the impact on clients. If clients are accessing a number of resources they will only need to authenticate the first time in the browser session so the extra step should not be too onerous. A number of other University resources already require authentication both and on and off campus.

More information about electronic resources is on the databases page or contact Ask a Librarian.

Database on trial: Art and Architecture in Video

Categories: Digital news, Library
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Published on: 9 July 2012
The Artist Was A Woman

The Artist Was A Woman
© Copyright © 1988. Used by permission of Filmakers Library. All rights reserved.

 

 

Art and Architecture in Video, via Alexander Street Press, is a collection of documentaries and interviews illustrating the history, theory and practice of art, design and architecture. Trial ends 3 August 2012

Your feedback is very important to us in deciding whether to purchase a database subscription or not. After reviewing a database please give us your feedback by filling in the Database Evaluation Form:  http://www.library.usyd.edu.au/databases/dbevaluation.html

More databases on trial  (more…)

DIGITAL NEWS

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Published on: 22 March 2012

HIGHLIGHTING SOME OF OUR PRIMARY SOURCE COLLECTIONS

The Library has expanded access to primary source materials through the acquisition of the following digital collections. Access to the collections is available to currently enrolled University of Sydney students, staff, and walk-in users of the Library.

House of Commons Parliamentary Papers Online  (1688–present)
Full text access to over 300 years of parliamentary debates, bills, command papers and reports and accounts, providing important historical record of the government of Britain and its colonies, as well as its impact on the wider world. It’s a valuable source of primary material encompassing all areas of social, political and economic policy. The 18th Century collection will be of great interest to those studying the early colonial history of the Americas, India and Australia. The19th Century collection provides access to the ideas and agendas of prominent 19th century thinkers, campaigners and innovators such as Anthony Trollope, John Stuart Mill, Michael Faraday, Charles Babbage and the Brunels. The 20th Century collection covers topics such as the World Wars, the formation of NATO and the United Nations, the end of Apartheid and the impact of September 11.

ADAM MATTHEW DIGITAL COLLECTIONS

portrait of a womanThe Grand Tour and Travel writing, spectacle and world history
We continue our exploration of travel with the addition of these collections. The Grand Tour explores the British response to travel on the Continent for pleasure, business and diplomacy between c1550 and c1850. The collection provides access to manuscript, visual and printed works including letters, diaries, guidebooks, paintings, sketches and architectural drawings drawn from private and public archives, including the British Library and the Paul Mellon Centre. Travel writing, spectacle and world history includes women’s travel diaries and correspondence of the 19th and 20thcenturies from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.
Image title: Portrait of a woman, traditionally identified as Margaret Stuart, Lady Hippisley Artist: Batoni, Pompeo Date: 1785 Reference: B1981.25.37 Source: Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection.

Foreign Office Files for China, 1949-80
Provides access to the complete British Foreign Office files dealing with China, Hong and Taiwan from the National Archives Kew. The collection includes coverage of key events in 20thcentury Chinese history  from the foundation of the People’s Republic, in 1949, to the death of Zhou Enlai and Mao, the arrest of the Gang of Four and the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976.
Victorian Popular Culture contains a wide range of source material relating to popular entertainment in America, Britain and Europe between 1779 and 1930. The collection is divided into three sections: spiritualism, sensation and magic; circuses, sideshows and freaks; music hall, theatre and popular entertainment, and  draws on collections ranging from the Harry Price Library of Magical Literature and the W.H Crain Barnum & Bailey Circus Collection.


Slavery, abolition and social justice, 1490-2007
is a portal for slavery and abolition studies bringing together documents and collections relating to slavery and its impact in North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa and the Caribbean. The collection provides access to original manuscripts, pamphlets, books, paintings, maps and U.S. Court records relating to slavery.

Mass Observation online provides access to the original manuscript and typescript papers created and collected by the Mass Observation organisation, together with printed publications, photographs and interactive maps. The collection provides an important insight into the social history of Britain between 1937 and the mid 1950s.

To see all our databases and electronic resources head to: http://sydney.edu.au/library/databases/

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