Special Exhibition: Magna Carta: 1215 – 2015

When: 15 June – 22 June 2015; 9:00am – 5:00pm

Where: Fisher Library F03, Level 3

 

It is 800 years ago that the Magna Carta, the “Great Charta” originally drafted by the Magna Carta working copy from the 14th centuryArchbishop of Canterbury has been accepted by King John of England.

Come and see a selection of Magna Carta copies held by the Rare Books and Special Collections at Fisher Library, including a 14th century working copy.

Julie Price, Liaison Librarian of the Rare Books and Special Collections, points out the 14th century copy in the centre of the display as her favourite: “I imagine it being carried on horseback through the English countryside, used to dispense law.”

Now – for one week only– you have the great opportunity to see these old working copies displayed in the Fisher Library.

 

Contact: Julie.Price@sydney.edu.au

T: 2 9351 2992

E: rarebook.library@sydney.edu.au

For updates on social media: #RareBooks

Exhibition: Highlights and Lowlifes – 29 June to 31 August

An exhibition on the Australian Holdings in the Detective Fiction Collection

Rare Books and Special Collections will be hosting a display of some of the Australian works held in the Detective Fiction Collection.

When: Monday 29 June to 31 August 2015, 9:00am – 5:00pm

Where: Rare Books Reading Room, Fisher Library F03, Level 1Covers from the books: ‘Cocaine Blues (Kerry Greenwood, 2012), ‘Death Wears a Lady’s Smile’ (Don Haring), ‘The Dying Trade’ (Peter Corris, 1980), ‘Still Murder’ (Finola Moorhead, 1991),’ Grim Pickings’ (Jennifer Rowe, 1987)

The Detective Fiction Collection began informally in the 1960’s following a donation to the Library, which contained a large number of Penguin crime paperbacks. More titles were extracted from later donations until, in 1974, the Library bought a major American collection of detective fiction (3,500 titles), many of them valuable first editions. This purchase so pleased Frederick May (then the University of Sydney’s Professor of Italian) that he donated 1,200 of his own crime fiction books, with the Library purchasing another 800 titles from his estate in 1978. At this time, the collection grows by donation, a little purchasing, and by the addition of NSW titles received on legal deposit.

The Detective Fiction Collection began informally in the 1960’s following a donation to the Library, which contained a large number of Penguin crime paperbacks. More titles were extracted from later donations until, in 1974, the Library bought a major American collection of detective fiction (3,500 titles), many of them valuable first editions. This purchase so pleased Frederick May (then the University of Sydney’s Professor of Italian) that he donated 1,200 of his own crime fiction books, with the Library purchasing another 800 titles from his estate in 1978. At this time, the collection grows by donation, a little purchasing, and by the addition of NSW titles received on legal deposit.

 

Collecting Crime

The Detective Fiction Collection is the biggest of its kind in Australia and is a major research resource for students of the genre, and of Australian literature, social studies and popular culture in general. Although called “detective fiction”, crime fiction would be a more apt term to describe the works held. Holdings run the gamut of the genre, ranging over murder and detective stories, spy fiction, psychological thrillers and police procedurals. All publishing formats are included, including variant editions, covers and multi-media. True crime material is not collected.

 

Australian holdings on display

The Australian holdings in this collection form a major part of its strengths. Crime in all its permutations has existed in our fiction since Australia’s days as a penal colony. The display will showcase the 19th century crime stories of writers such as John Lang, Marcus Clarke and Fergus Hume (“Mystery of a Hansom Cab”); the early Boney novels of Arthur Upfield; the pulp fiction explosion of the mid-20th century; the strength of Australia’s forgotten female crime writers from the 19th century such as Ellen Davitt and Mary Fortune through to the 20th century’s now unremembered stars such as Pat Flower, Pat Carlon, Margot Neville and June Wright. Also on display are examples of the most recent flowering of Australian detective fiction, beginning with Peter Corris and including Peter Temple, Barry Maitland, Claire McNab et al.

 

For updates on social media: #RareBooks; #FisherLibrary

 

Exhibition: Ex Libris Fisherarium art series

Data RetentionEx Libris Fisherarium is an ongoing series of art projects curated by Associate Professor Michael Goldberg. The projects comprising work by staff, alumni and associates of Sydney College of the Arts are themed around the idea of ‘the book’ in all its historical and contemporary manifestations.

Project: Data Retention by Gianni Wise

Artist’s Statement
With the proliferation of data networks, the human mind always find ways to ‘wire-up’ new connections between itself, objects, ideas, events and the world. I use wires and books as a form of ready-made art that work as props for memory. Objects external to the mind can trigger memory and make connections. I am interested in this interplay between mind and external world. When Umberto Ecco claimed in the Name of The Rose (1988): “Wanting connections, we found connections always, everywhere, and between everything” he refers to a world ‘exploding’ in a whirling network of interrelationships where everything (appears to) point to everything else, everything explains everything else.

Curator’s Statement
Gianni Wise’s installation has its menacing aspects. The title, ‘Data Retention’, might well refer to current government policies regarding the retention of metadata – the harvesting from telecommunications networks of personal information by law enforcement agencies – ostensibly to protect the public from acts of terrorism. Indeed, the installation itself displays a number of sinister ‘packages’. Perhaps they hold data. But they also disturbingly resemble IEDs (or ‘improvised explosive devices’). The ‘connections’ Wise refers to carry the potential to penetrate deep into our personal lives, challenging privacy and potentially violating fundamental rights. In this sense, the installation reflects on the threat of data retention exposing our personal lives ‘like an open book’. Wise’s use of ambiguously wired devices may equally suggest the mind’s desire to invent ‘paranoid’ connections where there are none.

Dates: 23 February to 26 March 2015
Where:
Levels 2, 3 and 4 exhibition cabinets, Fisher Library North
Cost: FREE and open daily to the public
Times: Opening times vary, please check the website

For details of past and current projects, connect with Ex Libris Fisherarium on Facebook.

Fisher 24 hour study zone

Categories: Library
Comments: 31 Comments
Published on: 30 July 2014

Fisher 24/7 Study ZoneWho can access the study zone?
All enrolled University of Sydney students carrying a current student card.

Where is the study zone?
Entrance Level (Foyer and South wing only)

What can I access after library hours?
You can access:

  • Computers
  • Online Library resources
  • Printers
  • The University wireless network
  • Group study spaces and lounges

How do I enter the study zone after library hours?
You can enter the study zone by swiping your student card at the after-hours entrance door 15 minutes after the Library closes. No special registration is required.

If you are using the Fisher 24 hour study zone before the Library closes, you will need to collect your belongings and borrow any items you need before exiting the Library at closing time. After the building has been cleared for re-entry to the 24 hour study zone, you can use your student card to re-enter.

My student card does not give me access to 24/7. What can I do?

You need to go to Campus Assist, Ground Floor , Services Building, to ask for 24/7 Fisher access to be encoded on to your student card.

What are the security arrangements?

  • Security patrols
  • Security emergency help points
  • CCTV cameras

You must keep your student card with you at all times, and follow the instructions of Security staff if directed.

For more information, see Security and your safety:
http://sydney.edu.au/current_students/transport_safety/safety.shtml

University Security Service: 9351-3333
This is an emergency number only.

 

Symposium – The Great Novels of 1814: Austen, Burney, Edgeworth and Scott

novels1814This symposium celebrates the bicentenary of four great novels published in the same year. Jane Austen is widely known and loved by a vast audience and The Great Novels of 1814 exhibition currently on display in the Fisher Library celebrates her novel Mansfield Park and works by her favourite authors: Frances Burney’s The Wanderer, Maria Edgeworth’s Patronage and Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley.

The proceedings will be chaired by Professor Margaret Harris, University of Sydney, starting at 9.30am with a welcoming morning tea during your registration. The symposium will feature papers from Professor William Christie, University of Sydney, Emeritus Professor Jocelyn Harris, University of Otago, Dr Stephanie Russo and Dr Ryan Twomey, Macquarie University, and Dr Olivia Murphy, Murdoch University.

A sandwich lunch will be provided at midday followed by a choice of activities: a screening of the film Amazing Grace, which is part of the Films at Fisher program complementing The Great Novels of 1814 exhibition, as well as the chance to visit the Nicholson and Macleay Museums.

At 5.30pm there will be a talk by Jacqui Grainger, Manager of Rare Books and Special Collections, about curating the exhibition, followed by a reception in the Exhibition Space, and a private viewing with the opportunity to talk to Jacqui more about the exhibition.

Event details

When: Wednesday 16 April 2014
Time:
9.30am – 7.30pm
Where: Seminar Room, Level 2, Fisher Library F03, Eastern Avenue, Camperdown Campus
Cost: Free with booking required. Places are limited to 50.
RSVP by Thursday 10 April 2014
E library.rsvp@sydney.edu.au
T 9114 0866

Films at Fisher

Films at FisherThe Library is presenting a series of free film screenings for students and staff in conjunction with our current exhibition Great Novels of 1814: Austen, Burney, Edgeworth and Scott

Wednesday Program: March & April 2014
Screenings commence at 2pm in the Exhibition Space, Level 2, Fisher Library

12 March Culloden (Dir. Peter Watkins, UK, 1964. B&W, not rated) The Jacobite rebellion of 1746 is brought thrillingly to life by Watkins. Shot as if made by a documentary film crew, we see the climactic battle from both English and Scottish viewpoints resulting in an anti-war masterpiece.
19 March Barry Lyndon (Dir. Stanley Kubrick, UK, 1975, rated PG) Set against the backdrop of the Anglo-Irish conflicts of the Eighteenth Century, Barry Lyndon tells of the escapades of an Irish adventurer in both love and war. Whilst director Kubrick’s genius is undisputed (2001:A Space Odyssey, The Shining, A Clockwork Orange), it is the stellar work of John Alcott’s Oscar-winning cinematography that lingers longest in the memory.
26 March The Madness of George III (Dir. Nicholas Hytner, UK, 1994, rated PG) As King George appears to succumb to the effects of dementia, a struggle for power breaks out in court and parliament. Alan Bennett’s magnificent screenplay is brought to life by a top-notch cast including Helen Mirren, Ian Holm and the stupendous Nigel Hawthorne.
2 April Mansfield Park (Dir. Patricia Rozema, UK, 1999, rated M) Patricia Rozema brings a freshness to Jane Austen’s 1814 novel, with an emphasis on the political context of slavery and colonialism. Critic Roger Ebert said of the film “This is an uncommonly intelligent film, smart and amusing too, and anyone who thinks it is not faithful to Austen doesn’t know the author but only her plots.
9 April Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (Dir. Peter Weir, UK, 2003, rated M) During the Napoleonic Wars Captain Jack Aubrey (Russell Crowe) pursues a French warship around the coast of South America. Crowe produces one of his finest performances, and Paul Bettany as his friend and chief scientist is outstanding.
16 April Amazing Grace (Dir. Michael Apted, UK, 2007, rated PG) A fine depiction of William Wilberforce’s campaign for the abolition of slavery in Britain. Ioan Gruffudd heads an excellent cast including such actors as Benedict Cumberbatch, Romola Garai and Albert Finney.

Exhibition: Treasures lost and found

LostTreasures5_15618 November 2013 to 31 January 2014

Shipwrecks and lost treasures captivate human curiosity and inspire treasure seeking. These books purchased to support postgraduate studies on Chinese and Vietnamese pottery describe treasured pottery. They provide a background to rumours and clues about the voyages and underwater sites where ships were thought to have sunk.

Cargoes of unique Chinese and Vietnamese pottery were shipped to remote destinations but not all ports were reached. Some ships suffered disastrous misfortunes and sunk to the sudden destination of the seabed.

The exhibition is presented by Aleksandra Nikolic (Arts Team) and the University Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections.

Where: Exhibition Space, Level 3, Fisher Library
Cost: FREE and open to the public
Times: Opening times vary please check the website

Further information
T 9351 4762
E aleksandra.nikolic@sydney.edu.au

Sense and Sensibilities – a history of the neurosciences

Categories: Exhibitions
Comments: No Comments
Published on: 1 November 2013

Neurosciences156Exhibition dates
18 June to 17 December 2013

The brain must surely be the most fascinating of all human organs. The early anatomists first explored its secrets; the physiologists began to investigate its pathways; the clinicians made clinic-pathological connections but we still have much to learn. This display includes many of the original works of the 14th to 19th centuries, which laid the foundations of our current knowledge of the neurosciences.

The exhibition is presented by the University Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections and International Society for the History of the Neurosciences.

Where: Exhibition Space, Level 2, Fisher Library
Cost: FREE and open to the public
Times: Opening times vary please check the website

Further information
T 9036 6465
E sara.hilder@sydney.edu.au

Image: Descartes, René, 1596-1650
De homine fi guris, et Latinitate donates a Florentio Schuyl
Lugduni Batavorum, ex offi cinal Hackiana, 1664. D3 Moore Collection.

See information on our other current exhibitions: sydney.edu.au/library/about/whatsnew/exhibitions/

 

Colin Rhodes: Shibboleth

Exhibition dates
12 August – 28 March 2014

Shibboleth by Colin Rhodes is the first project in the Fisher Library Series of Art Installations which explore ideas about the functions and purposes of libraries and the many different manifestations of books available to readers and researchers through library collections. The Series will also look at how contemporary art can revive an appreciation of the printed page in an age of digital media.

Colin Rhodes is the Dean of Sydney College of the Arts. Rhodes’ research is primarily in the areas of 20th century and contemporary art history and theory. He has written and lectured widely on Modernism, especially Expressionism in its many forms, and Self-Taught and Outsider Art. His books include the influential Outsider Art: Spontaneous Alternatives (2000), which has also been published in Spanish, French and Finnish editions, and Primitivism and Modern Art (1994), which is also in French translation. He has a particular interest in the ways in which western art and culture has interacted with that of its perceived others, and in those cultures of production that exist in the margins of the dominant art world. He is a regular contributor to Raw Vision, Création Franche and The Burlington Magazine. He has a keen commitment to drawing and exhibits his own art occasionally.

This installation is curated by Michael Goldberg, a senior lecturer at Sydney College of the Arts. He holds a particular interest in working in spaces not usually associated with contemporary art and how artwork that is commissioned specifically for those spaces can enliven them, encourage discussion and bring about new perspectives. He has curated art projects for Sydney Living Museums at Elizabeth Bay House, the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust, the Australian Museum and the City of Sydney.

The installations makes use of minimal labeling and instead encourage viewers to look at Tumblr and other blog sites associated with the projects. These online resources will offer artists’ information, descriptions and interpretations.

The exhibition is presented by the University Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections and Sydney College of the Arts

Where: Exhibition showcases, Level 2, 3 and 4, Fisher Library North.
Cost: FREE and open to the public
Times: Opening times vary please check the website

Image C.Rhodes, Australian Spirit I-IV and Nude Woman with Raised Arms (Level 2 Fisher North) taken by Michael Goldberg

Level 4 Fisher South toilet closure

Categories: Announcements
Comments: 2 Comments
Published on: 15 July 2013

Builders will be undertaking work on Level 4 Fisher South to prepare the new plumbing for Levels 5 to 9.  ‘Out of Order’ signs will be displayed on Friday 19 and then again on Friday 26 July.

The closure will be over two weekends – Friday 19 July through Monday 22 July and Friday 26 July through Monday 29 July.

The toilets will be operational on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.  The male, female and accessible toilets will be affected.

Apologies for any inconvenience caused by the renovations. We thank you for your patience.

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