Open Access Week is coming…

Categories: Library, Library talk
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Published on: 10 October 2016


To celebrate the International Open Access Week (24–30 October 2016), the Library is holding an Open Access Day.

When: 26 October

Where: Fisher Library: Seminar Room and Exhibition Space, Level 2
As part of the day we will host a debate on open access publishing featuring speakers from Sydney University Press and UTS ePress (more to be announced), a series of talks and drop-in sessions about funding requirements as specified by NHMRC and ARC, the University of Sydney’s approach to open access – our policy and procedures, copyrights issues, support available at the Library, open data and more. This is an opportunity for you to learn about open access, share your thoughts and concerns, and ask questions.

So… If you are perplexed, or simply want to know more about open access, please mark the date of 26 October in your diary.

We look forward to welcoming you to our Open Access Day, whether you attend the whole day or simply drop into the sessions that interest you. We can assure you that you’ll learn something new and be part of an exciting and invigorating day.


Please register for the event here



Time Presentation Speaker
9 – 9.15am Arrival and Welcomes Dr Robin Burgess, University Library
9.15 – 9.35am What, Why and How of Open Access Dr Robin Burgess, University Library
9.35 – 10am How We Can Help with Open Access Dr Muriel Swijghuisen Reigersberg, The Research Development and Collaboration Team
10 – 10.20am Open Access and Copyright Conundrums Kate Stanton and Brett McCarthy, University Library
10.20 – 10.40am Break
10.40 – 11.10am Authors’ Rights and Open Access

Don’t Just Click ‘Agree’ – Know What You’re Signing

Elaine Tam and Ludwig Sugiri, University Library
11.10 – 11.30am Supporting Our Researchers and Students: “Raise Your Research Profile” Online Tool Michelle Harrison, University Library
11.30 – 12.30pm Challenges and Opportunities of Open Access: The Publishers’ Discussion Chair: Susan Murray, Sydney University Press

Diana Jones, Elsevier Australia
Dr Belinda Tiffen, UTS ePress
Other speakers TBC

12.30 – 1.30pm Lunch
1.30 – 1.50pm Focus on Open Data Jennifer McLean, University Library
1.50 – 2.10pm Digging for Open Access: Focus on Archaeology Georgia Burnett, Macquarie University
2.10 – 2.30pm Honi Soit: Open Access Issues in a Digitisation Project Kathrin di Rocco, University Library
2.30 – 2.50pm Break
2.50 – 3.10pm Managing an Open Access Journal Made Easy Hannah McFarlane, Scholarly Publishing
3.10 – 3.30pm Managing Open Access Expectations: Funder Requirements (NHMRC and ARC) Dr Pearly Harumal, Research Portfolio
3.30 – 4pm Round Up Dr Robin Burgess, University Library


20 Aug: Les Murray Poetry Reading

We are delighted to welcome Les Murray back to Fisher Library for a reading from his newest poetry collection, “Waiting for the Past” (2015), his first in five years.

Les Murray


When: Thursday 20 August 2015; 5.30pm (refreshments) 6.00 – 7pm (reading)

Where: Fisher Library F03; Seminar Room; Level 2

In Waiting for the Past he continues his use of molten language.

From ‘The Black Beaches’ to ‘Radiant Pleats, Mulgoa’, from ‘High Speed Trap Space’ to ‘1960 Brought the Electric’, this is verse that renews and transforms our sense of the world.

Another new book of Les’, On Bunyah, will be published in October 2015. It brings together a collection of the poems Murray has written about the place where he comes from and by extension about the rural life and small communities of Australia.

Les Murray is one of Australia’s living treasures. He has published fourteen books of verse in Australia and his work is studied in schools and universities in Australia and beyond.


All are invited to attend this free event and light refreshments will be provided. Seats are limited for this very popular event so book early to avoid disappointment.

Cost: Free with booking required

RSVP:  by 17 August 2015

T 02 9114 0866

for updates on social media: #LesMurrayatFisher

10 July: Frédéric Billiet: The Musiconis Project

The University of Sydney Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections proudly present:


Professor Frédéric Billiet’s talk on

The MUSICONIS project: Representations of sound & music in the Middle AgesFrederic Billiet


When: 10th July; 10:00 – 11:00 am

Where: Fisher Library, Seminar Room Level 2

Introduction by Dr. Jane Hardie (Director, International Musicological Society)

The Musiconis project (University Paris-Sorbonne, French National Research Agency – ANR) is dedicated to the study of sound within the Medieval image. Besides regular seminars (reported in a dedicated blog), a specific bibliography and a lexicon in Latin, Langue d’Oïl and Langue d’Oc, the heart of this project has been the development of database using a new model of iconographic indexation (

RB Add.Ms. 373. 17th century. Handwritten Gregorian gradual on vellum. Spain.This model includes historical and organological information, as well as a description of the sound features in each image, and an interpretation of iconographic analogies.

The presentation focuses on the letter B of the first psalm depicting King David tuning his harp (ms. 246 D, fol. 1, BM of Charleville-Mézières). Thanks to the detailed observations regarding the proportions and the organization of the performer and his instrument on the page, as well as the reference to the commentaries of St Augustine, the research team discovered that David may actually refer to the figure of Christ, sitting on a foliage, as a metaphor of the divine Verb (musical of course, but not audible to the human ears).

For updates on social media: #RareBooks #FisherLibrary #Sydney_Library

Contact: Julie Price  +61 2 9114 2321


Poetry reading by Les Murray AO

Comments: 2 Comments
Published on: 28 March 2014

Les Murraywith an introduction by Sue Butler, Editor, The Macquarie Dictionary

We are delighted to welcome Les Murray back to Fisher Library for readings from his collections of poetry.

Les is engaged at the moment reading the proofs of the American edition of his Collected Works, to be published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. He says that the most he has to do is put in a comma that he should have put in years ago. Unlike Oscar Wilde who had the reverse difficulty – he struggled all morning taking a comma out and then in the afternoon put it back in again – Les thinks that the comma should always have been there, so as the afternoon wears on he will still leave it in. He agrees with Wilde however in general principle. A Murray dictum is: “When a book has reached this stage you do as little as possible because you will just end up ‘over-egging the pudding’.”

Les is heading off in May for a reading tour of Germany accompanied by his Swedish translator. He reads the English and she reads the German – although occasionally they swap. Her English has an American accent and Les’s German, according to one of his listeners, has improved. Then he presses on for more readings in London.

Les will read some old favourites and a number of new poems from a book in the making.

All are invited to attend this free event and light refreshments will be provided. This is a popular event and seats are limited so book early to avoid disappointment.

When: Tuesday 29 April 2014
Time: 5.30 for 6pm
Where: Exhibition Space, Level 2 Fisher Library
If you have registered your attendance and are unable to attend please let us know via
E or
T 9114 0866


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