Seminar and hands-on workshop: Blending virtual and physical reality to engage the next generation of students

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Published on: 23 June 2016

On the 4th July, please join us to hear about and experience virtual reality (VR) technology and discuss its possibilities for teaching in the STEM lab environment.

When: 4 July 2016; 12.00pm – 1.00pmMichael_VR

Where: Exhibition Space, SciTech Library

Cost: Free;

This event is presented jointly by Educational Innovation, ICT and the Library. A seminar will run from 12-1 pm in the Exhibition Space in the SciTech Library (booking required via the ‘Registration’ button below) followed by a drop-in, hands-on workshop in the Library’s exciting new ThinkSpace directly above (no booking required). Maaroof Fakhri, from Labster will be talking about how the capability of virtual reality (VR) technology has accelerated recently with the cost of devices falling to enable most phones to be adapted for a few dollars and how VR helps immerse students in experiences too expensive, too inaccessible or simply too dangerous than would normally be possible. For more information, see details below or watch the recent TED talk.

All are welcome – please pass on to interested colleagues including undergraduate and research students.

  1. Seminar and Q&A: Extending the Laboratory – How Virtual and Physical Reality can blend to engage the next generation of STEM students

Virtual reality is poised to become part of everyday campus life. Discover the practical and pedagogical side of VR and how it can transform learning, extend the impact of the laboratory and motivate students. Includes Q&A, discussion, and the latest VR tech.

Seminar date: 4 July 2016, 12-1 pm
Venue: Exhibition Space, SciTech Library (next to the entrance to the library)

Register here. 

  1. Hands-on workshop: Implementing gamified virtual lab simulations in University of Sydney courses as pre-lab exercises

This interactive hands-on session will involve using curriculum-ready gamified virtual laboratory simulations (computer-based) to enhance biology and chemistry courses through blended learning, and will include trying latest virtual reality technology.

Workshop date: 4 July 2016, 1-2.30 pm
Venue: ThinkSpace, Level 2 JFR plaza (mezzanine area above the SciTech Library)

No booking required.

 

 

New book: Gardens of History and Imagination

Categories: Library, New releases, SUP, SUP News
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Published on: 23 June 2016

23/06/2016

“making a garden was not only an act of settlement – it was one of hope, promising productivity and beauty and, in these creative endeavours, establishing a new life and even a new identity.” (Gretchen Poiner)

By Agata Mrva-Montoyagardens cover rgb full cover

To celebrate the bicentenary of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney University Press has released the much anticipated Gardens of History and Imagination: Growing New South Wales, edited by Gretchen Poiner, an honorary associate in the Department of Anthropology, and Sybil Jack, an honorary associate in the Department of History at the University of Sydney.

The book features ten scholars, members of the Independent Scholars Association (Sybil Jack, Janet George, Gaynor Macdonald, Ailsa McPherson, Colleen Morris, Gretchen Poiner, John Ramsland, Stuart Read, Catherine Rogers and Sue Rosen) exploring the significance of gardens in the history of New South Wales, and is richly illustrated with rarely seen images from the State Library’s Mitchell collections.

The authors explore the role of gardens in health and wellbeing, in social and cultural life, and in attempts to exercise moral control over the state’s citizens. They consider how changing fashions in garden design have reflected shifting economic, cultural and technological conditions. And they tell the stories of individual gardens and the gardeners who made them, from suburban veggie patches to grand country estates.

The book will be launched on 23 June 2016 at the Mitchell Library, the State Library of NSW.

Sharing made easy: a new sidebar for the Sydney eScholarship Repository

15/06/2016flyout

Did you know that you can now easily share articles from the Sydney eScholarship Repository?

By Gary Browne

Recently, our Library IT team has added a social sharing widget, using AddThis, to the repository of open access articles produced by researchers from the University of Sydney. The widget is implemented as a flyout sidebar on the left side of all the pages of the repository. So now, you can easily share the home page, community or collection pages and, of course, individual articles. In this way, you can effectively disseminate links to increase exposure of your work.

The sidebar is setup to display five social media options for sharing, which will vary depending on recent user behaviour. The sixth “plus” button opens a window with many more social media sharing options. The visible buttons will display number of shares for a specific page. But that’s not all. Through AddThis we can now generate reports of sharing activity, with graphs of top services, top content and more. So wait no longer and start sharing!

Undergraduate students wanted for focus group

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Published on: 7 June 2016

7/06/2016

What do students need to thrive_digital_slide-pic

Are you an undergraduate student?

Come and join us for a chat, a free lunch and receive a $30 voucher.

When: Wednesday 22 June

or

Wednesday 29 June

11.30am – 1.30pm

Where: Fisher Library, Exhibition Space

Let us know if you want to come!

Exhibition: Striking Chords

19/05/2016

Sounds and stories from the Rare Music collection

The image on the poster/postcard is from Raymond Hanson’s manuscript sketches for The Immortal Touch (c. 1970s). Raymond Hanson (1913-1976) was a composer and music educator who taught composition at the Conservatorium from the late 1940s until the 1970s.
Raymond Hanson’s manuscript sketches for The Immortal Touch (c. 1970s).

When: 19 May to 30 November 2016

Where: Fisher Library F03; Level 1; Rare Books & Special Collections Reading Room

This exhibition is a celebration of the University Library’s Rare Music collection, on the occasion of its relocation from the Conservatorium Library to Fisher Rare Books & Special Collections.

When the NSW State Conservatorium of Music was officially opened on 6 May 1915, its stated aims were “providing tuition of a standard at least equal to that of the leading European Conservatoriums”. It would seem logical then that the Rare Music collection of Australia’s first dedicated music education institution be concentrated around two main cultural waypoints: the European classical music tradition that the Conservatorium sought to transmit, and the Australian musical culture that developed from this foundation.

These two areas of strength provide natural entry points for exploring this varied and intriguing collection. They provide the framework for this exhibition, the aim of which is to showcase not only the objects themselves, but the continuation of their stories through ongoing scholarship and engagement.

#Sydney_library #RareBooks #RareMusic

HeadOn photo exhibition: Mongolian Youth

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Published on: 26 April 2016

26/04/2016

“It’s all going so fast,”sighs Gerelkhuu, a 26 year old artist living in Ulaanbaatar. “We have to remember who we are and to be careful not to lose our soul. If we don’t know who we are, we don’t know where we’ll go.”

When: 26 April – 30 May 2016

During a live performance of the rock band Mohanik, interior designer Enerel, 26, paints on a wall of the Glamour art gallery in downtown UB. In 2013, Enerel who used to live and study for 10 years in the US decided it was time to return to Mongolia. “More and more people are coming back” she said “bringing back what they learned abroad”.
During a live performance of the rock band Mohanik, interior designer Enerel, 26, paints on a wall of the Glamour art gallery in downtown UB. In 2013, Enerel who used to live and study for 10 years in the US decided it was time to return to Mongolia. “More and more people are coming back” she said “bringing back what they learned abroad”.

Where: Fisher Library Level 2 Corridor 208

Based in Brussels, Belgium, Marika Dee is a self-taught freelance documentary photographer. Originally, she worked as a jurist in international law and only discovered photography at a later age.
Her work explores social issues and youth culture.

As Mongolia is changing at a frantic pace and finding itself at the forefront of globalisation, its young urban generation is trying to keep up and figure out its identity.

Over the last few years Mongolia has experienced an unprecedented economic growth, driven by the massive development of mineral mining. With half of Mongolia’s 2.8 million living in the country’s capital and largest city Ulaanbaatar and more than half of the national population under the age of 30, the country has a young and increasingly urban population.

Almost 25 years after the democratic revolution that ended the communist era when Mongolia was a satellite state of the Soviet Union, a whole country is changing and its young urban generation is searching for an identity, trying to negotiate the difficult balance between the forces of globalization and the preservation of tradition.

If you like this exhibition, why not check out the HeadOn exhibition in the Law Library foyer on clouds (Photos by Daniel Arnaldi)

#headon #usydlibrary #mongolia #FisherLibrary

HeadOn photo exhibition: Clouds

26/04/02016

“To look at a cloud is often to look into a world where impressions suggest themselves like persistent dreams and memories, you see what you think is there, what your memory is telling you it is, rather than just seeing what is there.” Daniel Arnaldi (photographer)

When: 26 April – 30 May 2016Daniel Arnaldi : Clouds

Where: Herbert Freehills Law Library Foyer

Daniel Arnaldi’s work explores the human condition through portraiture, landscape and still life using the medium of photography to illustrate the range of inner states of our consciousness.

As I was editing these images for the show I realised they reflected the process that I’ve gone through and by extension a process that everyone going through a transformative phase might experience, they have been broken up into 3 subsets each one with its own title to reflect the various stages of such transformations.

Awakenings
The beginning of an awareness often coming in the form of a shock, violent, fiery, spectacular but also foreboding and threatening.

Disquiet
An uncomfortable stage where we have to come to terms and process new information that can sometimes be difficult. Feelings of isolation, depression, melancholy can be part of this process, sometimes all you can do is just ride it out, the colours in this particular series have been intentionally chosen for this effect.

Resolutions
As the name suggests a more energised stage tempered with focus, clarity and calmness. The blues invoking a feeling of tranquility while the more defined structure of the clouds still expressing strength. In all these photos clouds are still wide open to interpretation by the viewer, I hope that you let these photos be an entry point into your own inner journey of reflection, memory and emotion.

If you like this exhibition, why not check out the HeadOn exhibition in Fisher Level 2 about Mongolian Youth (Photos by Marika Dee)

#headon #Usydlibrary #FisherLibrary

Honi Soit – digitisation of a well-loved treasure

16/03/2016

Honi Soit, the University of Sydney’s student newspaper, has been published by the Students’ Representative Council since 1929 and forms a rich and informative source of the cultural and social history of the University, New South Wales and Australia.

By Sten ChristensenHoniSoit2

There is now a need to preserve and sustain the older editions of the newspaper, which are deteriorating due to the age, and a need to provide alternative methods of access to the content. The Library has committed funds for the digitisation of a large portion of the back set (1929-1990) and has engaged the services of a company that specialises in this type of digitisation, DatacomIT.

This is the first phase of the project which involves the digitisation and scanning of the newspaper and the processing of a large number of digital files. The sum total of the data will be over a 1TB (1000 Gigabytes! This has been done onsite given the rare and fragile state of the material. Following on from the scanning and file processing we will move to phase two, discussing with the SRC on making the material that we have digitised available online to the public.

As the digital files are fully processed and checked we will be making samples available prior to the 1929 to 1990 back set going online.

Please direct any inquiries to Sten Christensen Associate Director, Publishing and Data (sten.christensen@sydney.edu.au)

#honisoit #sydney_library #behindthescenes

New spaces, new names

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Published on: 29 February 2016

 

29/02/2016

From Semester 1, 2016 our new spaces will be re-named to reflect their new identities. For a summary of the changes, please see the table below.

By Belinda Norman

“Commons” was chosen as it reflects what we are trying to achieve in space and service delivery. The word “commons” embodies the principle of open access which the Library strives to promote, both in terms of information and education, but also as a physical space open to all staff and students .“Commons” also reflects the peer to peer learning and support model we’re growing within these spaces, and our intention to make them places where our clients can collaborate and create their own workshops and events.

 

Old Name New  Name
Badham Library, Badham Building The Quarter
Camden Library Camden Commons
Medical Library, Bosch Building Bosch Commons

#Sydney_library #TheQuarter

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