“Whose Data is it Anyway?”: Sharing data across disciplines and sectors


When: 27 October 2016, 1pm-2pm

Where: Fisher Library Seminar Room (218) – Location: level 2, Fisher.

Academic presentations will explore a diversity of ways in which data might be shared responsibly. The panel will link this data sharing activity to avenues for innovation, broadly defined. Throughout, the audience will be encouraged to unpick definitions of the terms ‘data’ and ‘innovation’ and what these might mean in a variety of disciplinary contexts. The panel hopes to generate an academic and theoretical enthusiasm for thinking creatively about how responsible data sharing might improve knowledge across all areas of enquiry and innovation.”


1pm – 1.20pm

Dr Muriel Swijghuisen Reigersberg (Research Development, DVCR Portfolio): “Data? What data? Sharing research responsibly in the arts, humanities and social sciences.”

1.20pm – 1.40pm

Associate Professor Matthew Todd (School of Chemistry): “The Anatomy of a Peer-Reviewed Open Science Paper”

1.40pm – 2pm

Associate Professor Alex Holcombe (Psychology): “Better science through sharing: Open Science Framework, preregistration, and GitHub”


Lunchtime ‘quick bites’ talks

Back by popular demand, the University Library will be offering a new program of ‘quick bite’ talks throughout October. These are chiefly targeted at Higher Degree Research students and Early Career Researchers, although all researchers and research support staff are invited to attend!

We welcome attendance in person and via video link (stay tuned for details). All talks will be recorded and uploaded to the University of Sydney Library’s You Tube Channel.

Increase your research impact: Extend your reach beyond the academy

What does impact mean in the context of university research? This session explores the shift from output to impact, identifies some key indicators of research impact, and considers strategies for increasing your impact outside academia.

Date: Friday, 7 October

Time: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

Location: Carslaw Lecture Room 351



Smart social media: Bring your networking A-game to academic work

Twitter, and LinkedIn, and Research Gate – oh my! Are you being strategic in your use of social media to promote yourself and your research? This session looks at strategic approaches to social media, and provides some helpful tips for maximising your presence on networks.

Date: Wednesday, 12 October

Time: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

Location: Carslaw Lecture Room 351



Building your research profile: What’s in a name? Get credit for your research from the outset

If you’re a debutante on the research scene, it’s crucial that your research identity is well-maintained. This session will provide an overview of the different types of researcher profiles out there, and introduce you to ORCID IDs.

Date: Friday, 14 October

Time: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

Location: Carslaw Lecture Room 351



Copyright and your thesis: Understand Intellectual Property policy and the legal use of third party material

Who owns the copyright on your thesis? How can you use third-party material legally and ethically? What are the copyright implications of thesis-by-publication? Sometimes copyright issues can seem like a headache – so this session is designed to make them much easier to understand.

Date: Friday, 21 October

Time: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

Location: Carslaw Lecture Room 351



Authors’ rights and Open Access: Don’t just click ‘agree’ – know what you’re signing!

Don’t fall prey to common publishing pitfalls – know what to consider when signing publisher contracts and understand how Open Access publishing maximises exposure to your research.

Date: Wednesday, 26 October

Time: 10:40am – 11:10am

Location: Seminar Room (218), Fisher Library



Open Educational Resources: Find out about learning material for use in the public domain

A quick bite that would appeal to educators! Heard of the term ‘OER’, but unsure what it means? Let us introduce you to the world of Open Educational Resources! This session will explain how to embed learning material from the public domain in your teaching.

Date: Friday, 28 October

Time: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

Location: Carslaw Lecture Room 351



Translate your research for industry: Fast track the process of finding industry collaborators

We all know that research doesn’t exist in isolation – it has real-world implications. But have you considered how to pitch your research so that it can be understood by people outside of academia? This session will provide you with some tips and tricks for doing just that!

Date: Monday, 31 October

Time: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

Location: Carslaw Lecture Room 351




Please direct all enquiries to Pat Norman: pat.norman@sydney.edu.au

Sharing made easy: a new sidebar for the Sydney eScholarship Repository


Did you know that you can now easily share articles from the Sydney eScholarship Repository?

By Gary Browne

Recently, our Library IT team has added a social sharing widget, using AddThis, to the repository of open access articles produced by researchers from the University of Sydney. The widget is implemented as a flyout sidebar on the left side of all the pages of the repository. So now, you can easily share the home page, community or collection pages and, of course, individual articles. In this way, you can effectively disseminate links to increase exposure of your work.

The sidebar is setup to display five social media options for sharing, which will vary depending on recent user behaviour. The sixth “plus” button opens a window with many more social media sharing options. The visible buttons will display number of shares for a specific page. But that’s not all. Through AddThis we can now generate reports of sharing activity, with graphs of top services, top content and more. So wait no longer and start sharing!

Open Access – 4 Common Myths Dispelled

Categories: Library
Comments: Comments Off
Published on: 23 October 2015
“Yes I told you” Patrick Hochstenbach (author)

By Charlotte Jarabak

1. OA journals are of poorer quality than traditional journals

Majority of OA journals are peer reviewed and have high impact factors. In fact, there are 1,313 OA journals indexed in Web of Science and 4,240 OA journals in Scopus. The highest Impact Factor of OA journal in WOS “Living Reviews in Relativity” is 19.25.

2. OA journals charge publication fees

Whilst predatory publishers are a problem, most OA journals charge no fees.

3. My research is on my website – so I don’t need to put it in a repository

Publishing in an OA journal or repository makes your work much easier to find, resulting in increased citation rates.

4. Publishing in a conventional journal does not allow open access

An increasing number of traditional journals now give permissions to publish in OA publications. You can check publisher’s position in Sherpa RoMEO database of publisher copyright policies.


Need more information or support?

Please contact your Academic Liaison Librarian:



OAWeek: The best reasons to publish in open access

Categories: Library
Comments: Comments Off
Published on: 19 October 2015


source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d7/Open_Access_Week_-_Web_Header.jpg CC by Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic




Do you want as many people as possible to read your research?

Do you want it to be accessible not just by academics, but also by journalists, policy makers and the general public?

Open access (OA) publishing is the best way to ensure that your important research reaches as many readers as possible.

Strong evidence shows that publishing in open access formats increases citation rates by around 50% open access has also been shown to increase the longevity of an article’s relevance, as well as significantly increasing mentions in social media.

An increasing number of traditional journals now give permissions to publish in OA publications. You can check publisher’s position in Sherpa RoMEO database of publisher copyright policies.

Need more information or support? Please contact your Academic Liaison Librarian.


How to get ‘Open Access’ into your publishing contract

Categories: Library
Comments: 2 Comments
Published on: 31 October 2012

Negotiating a publishing contract can be difficult at the best of times. However, now that grant funding bodies such as the NHMRC are making it a requirement that resulting research publications be made publically available on open access, the negotiations around the publishing contract becomes even more important.

To make the potential negotiation process a little simpler the University of Sydney Library, in consultation with the Office of General Counsel, have developed an Addendum Generator which creates the addendum for you.

All you need to do is to complete the four fields on the form and the ‘generator’ will create the text. Then sign the form and add it to the original contract.

Essentially the addendum allows

You to:

  • use, reproduce, distribute, create derivatives of the  work  in electronic, digital or print form in connection with your teaching, conference presentations, lectures, other scholarly works, and for all your academic and professional activities.
  • authorise others to make, the final published version of the work available in digital form over the Internet,

Your institution to:

  • provide an electronic version of the work to be made publicly available in an  open access repository for any scholarly purpose only.
  • authorise the NHMRC, the ARC or any other public research funding body to make a copy of the peer-reviewed manuscript of the work available for public access no later than 12 months after the official date of publication.

Next time you come to sign a publisher contract think about what you are signing and remember to not sign your rights away.

Sten Christensen, Repository Coordinator, Sydney eScholarship
T 02 9351 7407
E sten.christensen@sydney.edu.au

Make your PhD thesis available on Open Access. The sky won’t fall on your head!

Categories: Library
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Published on: 16 July 2012


Sten Christensen, Sydney eScholarship, University of Sydney Library

“If I make my thesis available on open access I won’t be able to publish it.”
Wrong, you will still be able to publish it.

There are many misconceptions in relation to making your thesis available on open access, this is the main one and it’s incorrect. Any reputable publisher will take the thesis as a raw manuscript and will edit it so that it is palatable to a wider audience. As such there should be a marked difference between the thesis and the published work; therefore there should be no issue, see Thesis into book. Advice to the desperate (more…)

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