Sharing made easy: a new sidebar for the Sydney eScholarship Repository

15/06/2016flyout

Did you know that you can now easily share articles from the Sydney eScholarship Repository?

By Gary Browne

Recently, our Library IT team has added a social sharing widget, using AddThis, to the repository of open access articles produced by researchers from the University of Sydney. The widget is implemented as a flyout sidebar on the left side of all the pages of the repository. So now, you can easily share the home page, community or collection pages and, of course, individual articles. In this way, you can effectively disseminate links to increase exposure of your work.

The sidebar is setup to display five social media options for sharing, which will vary depending on recent user behaviour. The sixth “plus” button opens a window with many more social media sharing options. The visible buttons will display number of shares for a specific page. But that’s not all. Through AddThis we can now generate reports of sharing activity, with graphs of top services, top content and more. So wait no longer and start sharing!

Open Access – 4 Common Myths Dispelled

Categories: Library
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Published on: 23 October 2015
http://openaccess.be/2012/10/24/yes-i-told-you-an-open-access-cartoon/
“Yes I told you” Patrick Hochstenbach (author)

By Charlotte Jarabak

1. OA journals are of poorer quality than traditional journals

Majority of OA journals are peer reviewed and have high impact factors. In fact, there are 1,313 OA journals indexed in Web of Science and 4,240 OA journals in Scopus. The highest Impact Factor of OA journal in WOS “Living Reviews in Relativity” is 19.25.

2. OA journals charge publication fees

Whilst predatory publishers are a problem, most OA journals charge no fees.

3. My research is on my website – so I don’t need to put it in a repository

Publishing in an OA journal or repository makes your work much easier to find, resulting in increased citation rates.

4. Publishing in a conventional journal does not allow open access

An increasing number of traditional journals now give permissions to publish in OA publications. You can check publisher’s position in Sherpa RoMEO database of publisher copyright policies.

 

Need more information or support?

Please contact your Academic Liaison Librarian:

http://www.library.usyd.edu.au/contacts/subjectcontacts.html

#oaweek

OAWeek: The best reasons to publish in open access

Categories: Library
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Published on: 19 October 2015

20/10/2015

source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d7/Open_Access_Week_-_Web_Header.jpg CC by Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic

 

 

 

Do you want as many people as possible to read your research?

Do you want it to be accessible not just by academics, but also by journalists, policy makers and the general public?

Open access (OA) publishing is the best way to ensure that your important research reaches as many readers as possible.

Strong evidence shows that publishing in open access formats increases citation rates by around 50% open access has also been shown to increase the longevity of an article’s relevance, as well as significantly increasing mentions in social media.

An increasing number of traditional journals now give permissions to publish in OA publications. You can check publisher’s position in Sherpa RoMEO database of publisher copyright policies.

Need more information or support? Please contact your Academic Liaison Librarian.

#oaweek

How to get ‘Open Access’ into your publishing contract

Categories: Library
Comments: 2 Comments
Published on: 31 October 2012

Negotiating a publishing contract can be difficult at the best of times. However, now that grant funding bodies such as the NHMRC are making it a requirement that resulting research publications be made publically available on open access, the negotiations around the publishing contract becomes even more important.

To make the potential negotiation process a little simpler the University of Sydney Library, in consultation with the Office of General Counsel, have developed an Addendum Generator which creates the addendum for you.

All you need to do is to complete the four fields on the form and the ‘generator’ will create the text. Then sign the form and add it to the original contract.

Essentially the addendum allows

You to:

  • use, reproduce, distribute, create derivatives of the  work  in electronic, digital or print form in connection with your teaching, conference presentations, lectures, other scholarly works, and for all your academic and professional activities.
  • authorise others to make, the final published version of the work available in digital form over the Internet,

Your institution to:

  • provide an electronic version of the work to be made publicly available in an  open access repository for any scholarly purpose only.
  • authorise the NHMRC, the ARC or any other public research funding body to make a copy of the peer-reviewed manuscript of the work available for public access no later than 12 months after the official date of publication.

Next time you come to sign a publisher contract think about what you are signing and remember to not sign your rights away.

Contact:
Sten Christensen, Repository Coordinator, Sydney eScholarship
T 02 9351 7407
E sten.christensen@sydney.edu.au

Make your PhD thesis available on Open Access. The sky won’t fall on your head!

Categories: Library
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Published on: 16 July 2012

OpenAccessLogo

Sten Christensen, Sydney eScholarship, University of Sydney Library


“If I make my thesis available on open access I won’t be able to publish it.”
Wrong, you will still be able to publish it.

There are many misconceptions in relation to making your thesis available on open access, this is the main one and it’s incorrect. Any reputable publisher will take the thesis as a raw manuscript and will edit it so that it is palatable to a wider audience. As such there should be a marked difference between the thesis and the published work; therefore there should be no issue, see Thesis into book. Advice to the desperate (more…)

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